What To Consider When Making Specific Gifts in Your Will

What to consider when making specific gifts in your Will

When preparing your Will there are a number of things to consider such as who to appoint as your Executor, the beneficiaries of your estate and whether you wish to leave any specific gifts to a particular family member or friend.

A ‘gift’ can be anything from a particular item of jewellery to a sum of money.  Below it will be discussed the matters that should be considered if you want to leave a gift under your Will.

Firstly, you cannot gift an item if you do not own them.  This situation can arise where a property is held under a Self-Managed Superannuation Fund or under a Trust.  Another situation to mention is when an item is owned jointly with another person.  In this case, the surviving owner will obtain the asset upon your passing.  Consequently, if you gift an item that you do not own, or is jointly owned, will be ineffective under your Will.

Secondly, it is important to update your Will to ensure that if the asset you have gifted still exists when you pass away.  We understand that life happens and that items and assets are sold or given away during your lifetime.  Therefore it is important to update your Will if you know that you no longer hold an asset.  However, if you have made a gift that is no longer in your possession, the direction in your Will would be ineffective and result in the recipient not receiving the gift.

Finally, if you wish to gift a particular asset or item under your Will, it is important to consider these items are properly described.  It is recommended to provide adequate detail when describing your asset to ensure your wishes are consistent as under your Will.

If you wish to discuss your Will, please do not hesitate to contact our friendly Canny Legal team.

 

Kayla Kennedy

Law Clerk

 

 

 

PPSR – Personal Property Securities Register

Hidden interests…buyers beware!

Persons who obtain finance, more commonly commercial, car or personal finance, a security interest is generally registered on the Personal Property Securities Register known as the PPSR.  In doing so, they are securing their interests on the borrower’s personal property, such as cars, boats, plant and equipment, but does not include land, certain licences and a few other exceptions.  While registration of a security interest is not compulsory, a financier (secured party) may lose its priority to the personal property if it is in competition with other security interests.

If you are looking to purchase business, plant, equipment, car, boat, trailer or the like, a search of the person and/or company in ownership of the property is a must as part of your due diligence.  At settlement and transfer of the property you have a right to clear and free possession of that property from the seller.  If the personal property is under finance and the PPSR charge is not released when the property is transferred to you, the financier has a right, in the first instance, to repossess the property should the seller default on their loan arrangement.  It is important that any security interests are discharge prior to the property being transferred to you.

The PPSR is a single national register for personal property security interests and an online noticeboard of the particulars of a security interest for a particular individual or company.

Follow the link below to find out more information about the PPSR: https://www.ppsr.gov.au/ppsr-overview

If you wish to discuss your own secured property or that of a sellers please contact our legal team on 03 5278 95000 or email legal@cannygroup.com.au

 

Katherine Taylor – Law Clerk

BCriminology (History)

Casual Conversion Rights

Often our business clients want advice on putting into place employment arrangements that are flexible in the form of casual employment arrangements that may also suit employees.

At times the business may want confidence in the employee’s performance before considering a full time contract or the business may be approached by a casual employee who seeks to be converted to full time employment after working regular hours.

In September 2018 the Fair Work Commission (FWC) turned its attention to the question of “Casual Conversion” and the employer’s obligation to convert a causal employee working regular hours to full time or part time permanent employment.  From 1 October 2018 the FWC varied many awards to include this right.  Subject to certain prerequisites in many circumstances (that is 84 Modern Awards in addition some 28 Modern Awards that already contain the right) an employee has a right to request casual conversion to permanent employment.

The rights is subject to the casual employee working a pattern of hours over the previous 12 months that they could continue to perform on a full time or part time basis under the provision of the applicable award.

Subject to the formalities such as the request being in writing the employer may refuse only on reasonable grounds such as: the employee is not working regular hours; it is known or reasonably foreseeable the employee’s position will end; it is known that the employee’s hours will significantly reduce in the next 12 months.  Any such ground must be provided to the employee in writing in 21 days of the request being made.  If the employee disputes the alleged facts or claimed reasonable bases, the dispute will be heard at FWC.

Accordingly business are not required to offer employees under relevant Modern Awards permanent employment and the casual employee’s right depends on the facts determining regular employment over the preceding 12 months.  If casual employees prefer flexibility and 25% higher pay they will not exercise this right.

If you would like more information, or to find our how we can help – please get in touch with our team.

 

Richard Pinkstone – Principal Solicitor

BA, LLB

New Year Resolutions that Will Make A Real Difference To You + Loved Ones

Now that the dust has settled on what was hopefully a fun-and-family-filled Christmas and New Year period, it is a great time to reflect on those hastily-made New Year’s resolutions, and consider the difference it will make if you actually see them through.

Perhaps you resolved that in 2019 you will exercise more, quit smoking, drink less, or spend less time looking at your phone.

For others, you may have decided that 2019 is the year you get your personal, financial or business affairs in order. That may include getting those Wills and Powers of Attorney prepared (which you’ve been meaning to do for years), getting that accounting or financial advice you know will make a difference, or kick-starting that business which you’ve been daydreaming about.

Now these are New Year’s resolutions that will make a real difference to you, your loved-ones, your financial health and your current/future employees.

The most important part is getting the process started. The second-most important part is making sure that each of the elements of your plan complement, and do not contradict each other. For example, the superannuation or asset planning which you undertake with an accountant or financial advisor should be reflected in your will, your business plan should be supported by adequate funding arrangements and succession agreements, and your business tax planning and compliance must be complemented by appropriate employment agreements for your staff.

Ideally, this means you should be seeing a lawyer, accountant and financial adviser contemporaneously, and have them talk to each other to ensure each element is consistent. But who has the time and energy for that?

This is where Canny Group can help you stick to your New Year’s resolutions. We have a team of experienced accountants, lawyers and financial advisers under one roof who are ready to listen, identify your needs or the needs of your business, and work cohesively to get your affairs in order, or your dream off the ground, for the best possible start to 2019.

 

Stefan Manche

Senior Associate Solicitor – LLB, BComm (Finance) 

Debt Recoveries

The world of business dealings is underpinned by trust and reliance on promises to supply goods or services often with the consideration such as payment of money, a debt being due sometime in the future.  Once a contract is legally enforceable, the Court will, if the contract is breached, allow the injured party to seek recovery in the Courts.

Canny Legal regularly act in “debt recovery” proceedings.  Some claims may be very simple such as a failure or refusal to pay monies on account.  However in the cut and thrust of business dealings, contracting parties may have complex arrangements to reach out to potential customers and rely on more complex trading terms.

Suppliers may offer their customers credit terms reflecting their trade requirements.  For example a plumber may have a business which has many projects under way and needs plumbing supplies to compete works before it gets paid from expected future profit.  The supplying company may agree to trade on credit with interest which should also be secured by a personal guarantee and a charge over the director’s property. In this scenario we often find our client’s customers may “bite off more than they can chew” and default in their accounts resulting in debt recovery proceedings.

On the other side of the fence we also act for defendants against claims for monies due and owing and we will explore any genuine defences available to defeat the claim or reduce it by way of set-off.

Debt recovery requires the careful weigh-up of a return for recovery on a debt as against time, legal costs and the uncertainties of litigation.  There will be a range of facts to consider before being able to assess and legally advice on the merits of each claim or each defence.

If you would like more information, we are always here to help.  Please get in touch with our team.

 

Richard Pinkstone – Principal Solicitor

BA, LLB